COVIDs – the new centre for climate change research

Global Infomatics Data on COVIDs (hot spots for air pollution) is an emerging discipline in environmental sciences, says Prof Fintan Cook of McMaster University, Canada. Our understanding of the role of air pollutants in…

COVIDs - the new centre for climate change research

Global Infomatics

Data on COVIDs (hot spots for air pollution) is an emerging discipline in environmental sciences, says Prof Fintan Cook of McMaster University, Canada. Our understanding of the role of air pollutants in mitigating climate change has largely been “downplayed”. COVIDs demonstrate that our understanding of what pollutants have ecological and climate-system impacts is incorrect.

Dr Christopher Bleicher, of the Canadian Armed Forces Research Institute, explains that atmospheric COVIDs are a key element of air pollution analysis, clarifying the role that pollution plays in mitigating climate change. These patterns have consequences for the environment. In stratospheric COVIDs over the high Arctic, residents of the Canadian Arctic experience Arctic atmospheric carbon dioxide at a lower density than anywhere else on Earth, resulting in the desert-like conditions in the coldest regions of our planet.

COVIDs can also make invaluable contribution to our understanding of human health and well-being. Smog-inducing particulate matter is toxic to the lungs, impairing the ability of the population to breathe and the health of any living beings that breathe it in. In Toronto this affects the children, particularly, as they are able to be exposed to more pollution over time and become exposed at earlier ages. It also increases the severity of respiratory diseases, such as asthma.

This resulting blow to the health of the population therefore raises important questions about remedial measures, such as development of wind technology and the development of healthier transport systems. These are simply not currently being taken, partly because they appear to be ineffective.

Obtaining accurate information on COVIDs is difficult, and requires the elevation of the science. Smoke stacks and chimneys are often located in and around residential areas. Currently, it is difficult to obtain any reliable information on these hot spots from these geographic locations, as their data are not available. Scientists are therefore only able to obtain information on these sites from outside North America.

Instead, research on this climate change-induced air pollution hotspot has thus been carried out in the North. Methods of performing this research have been challenging because air pollution data does not reflect any real change in the main weather systems that issue the city’s climate. We will now be able to not only change these climate patterns, but also provide new research and solutions that we cannot easily manage within any one part of the planet.

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©McMaster University

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