A new way to fight cancer could save the lives of thousands. Will it work?

December 4th marks the 22nd anniversary of Jonestown, the massacre in Guyana that claimed the lives of 900 in 1985. More than a quarter century later, family members and survivors of the tragedy still…

A new way to fight cancer could save the lives of thousands. Will it work?

December 4th marks the 22nd anniversary of Jonestown, the massacre in Guyana that claimed the lives of 900 in 1985.

More than a quarter century later, family members and survivors of the tragedy still mourn the victims who lost their lives and the many people who were left behind. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released an estimate that the number of cancer deaths is likely even higher.

“Cancer is a disease that, if left untreated, can ravage the body and lead to death. Finding a way to prevent and effectively treat cancer is still a challenge for science and medicine,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald. “The best scientific information, and the best people, are what we need to lead on these efforts to improve the health of all Americans.”

CDC researchers recently identified a new way to combat CoVID-19, a group of proteins that’s been linked to cancer. The research, published in The Cancer Journal, identifies a small molecule known as sacstone as a new way to block the CVID-19 pathway.

“Our report identifies a novel target for CVID-19 therapy,” said Philip Landrigan, MD, professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and an author of the study. “This ‘tiny’ molecule is able to selectively inhibit the protein’s ability to make its way into cells.”

People with higher levels of CVID-19 protein appear to have a greater risk of developing breast, lung, colorectal, pancreatic, liver, skin, oesophageal, esophageal, head and neck, esophagitis, gallbladder, stomach, esophagus, gastric cancer, and neuroblastoma, according to the CDC.

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